Caves

9 Famous Sea Caves Around The World with Pictures

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Sea caves are nature’s most beautiful sights to behold. Formed by the constant and tremendous force of the waves on a weakened spot of the shoreline or coastal cliff causing them to crack from within and take form over the years, sea caves have come to exist throughout the world, some small and some large. Intrigued by the mystery of these sea caves, people from far and near come to explore them. While the two best known sea caves are Europe’s Fingal’s Cave on Staffa Island in Scotland and The Blue Grotto of Capri, the Greek Islands, the west coastal states of the United States, the Bristish Isles and the Hawaiian Islands boast of a variety of equally splendid sea caves.

Sea caves can be explored using boats or on foot during low tide, which is deemed advisable since a wave carries more power inside a cave. Unlike terrestrial caves, inside a sea cave there are no sculptures or carvings to see or depths to explore. What then captures one’s attention? It is the sheer beauty and existence of sea life. Let’s take a gilded tour for a visual insight into some of the world’s most captivating sea caves.

Fingal’s Sea Cave:

sea caves

Fingal’s Sea Cave on the Scottish Island of Staffa is by far the most famous sea cave the world has ever known. Its unique structure formed from hexagonally jointed basalt columns is a true work of Mother Nature. The columns form a beseeching walkway inviting visitors to explore deep inside.

Waiahuakua Sea Cave:

The Waiahuaka Sea Cave located along the Na Pali Coast on the Hawaiian island of Kauai is the second longest and one of the most beautiful sea caves in the world. It stretches over 350 meters in length and is notable for its entrance and exit which is why it is also known as the Double Door Cave. The most arresting feature of this cave is a waterfall that flows from a crevasse in the roof of the rock.

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Sea Lion Caves:

America’s largest Sea Cave in Florence, Oregon is home to the sea lions. During the cold winter season you can find them huddled together while in summer they can be caught basking around in the warmth.

Paphos Sea Caves:

Located on the rugged coastline north of Coral Bay in Cyprus, the Paphos Sea Caves with its rocky columns and natural caves is a picture of tranquility and calm.

Deep Sea Cave:

Deep Sea Caves are an absolute thrill for underwater divers looking to explore the complex system of caves and the existing sea life within that are not found elsewhere.

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Sea Cave, Malta:

The Blue Grotto Sea Cave in Malta is a compelling sight. Named after the Blue Grotto in Capri, this natural sea cave has a towering archway at the entrance through which visitors enter in boats. It consists of six caves that sparkle with the reflection of the clear blue water of the sea.

England’s Sea Cave:

Englands Sea Cave

The Mewstone Sea Cave in England looks fresh out of a fairy tale. The entrance permits a view of the setting sun in the horizon that makes for an impressive sight.

See More: Robber’S Cave Pictures

Sea Cave Restaurant, Italy:

Experience the wonders of dining out at sea in Italy’s Sea Cave Restaurant in Grotta Palazzese. The century old restaurant carved from the cliff’s limestone surface and jutting out 74 ft above sea level offers travelers a unique dining experience.

Sea Life in Sea Caves:

Microorganisms are the life of the sea. Minuscule in size and barely visible to the naked eye, they thrive in places where most other sea species cannot. Some other common sea creatures that can be found on the walls and floors of a sea cave are goose neck barnacles, sponges, small leopard sharks and sea lions.

Images Source: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.